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Hunters are advised to report any deer that looks sick to the AGFC at 1-800-482-9262. AGFC photo.

Hunters are advised to report any deer that looks sick to the AGFC at 1-800-482-9262. AGFC photo.

A list of veterinarians who have expressed interest in collecting samples and testing hunter-harvested deer for chronic wasting disease has been published on the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s website at http://www.agfc.com/hunting/Documents/CWD/CWDVets.pdf.

All results from the tests will be shared with the AGFC, but it is the responsibility of the hunter to pay any fees associated with using one of the listed veterinarians to process samples.

The AGFC will test hunter-harvested deer taken from the CWD Management Zone (Boone, Carroll, Johnson, Logan, Madison, Marion, Newton, Pope, Searcy and Yell counties) on a voluntary basis during opening weekend of deer season (Nov. 12-13).

AGFC staff will be collecting CWD samples from hunter-harvested elk Nov. 12-13 in the CWD Management Zone. AGFC Photo.

AGFC staff will be collecting CWD samples from hunter-harvested elk Nov. 12-13 in the CWD Management Zone. AGFC Photo.

According to Cory Gray, AGFC deer program coordinator, the AGFC’s deer team developed the list of vets to offer hunters outside of those counties or those who harvest deer outside of opening weekend the opportunity to test their deer if they wished.

“We can’t test every deer harvested in the state, but we do want to offer an option for hunters who are concerned with the possibility of the deer they harvested having CWD,” Gray said. “While a CWD test is not a food safety test, it may put some hunters’ minds at ease about serving it to their family.”

The recent detection of chronic wasting disease has many hunters concerned about the safety of eating venison, but there shouldn’t be any reason to worry. Hunter-harvested venison is still one of the healthiest forms of protein you can find, free of preservatives, steroids and other chemicals that can be found in some farm-raised foods.

“There isn’t any confirmed case of CWD spreading to any species outside of the cervid family (deer, elk, moose and caribou),” said Cory Gray, deer program coordinator for the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. “But the World Health Organization and Arkansas Department of Health both advise against eating any animal known to have CWD.”

Hunters shouldn’t eat any animal showing obvious signs of any illness.

“Any hunter anywhere in the state who sees a deer showing symptoms of CWD should report it to 1-800-482-9262,” Gray said. “We can dispatch someone to collect samples from that animal and will let the person reporting know the outcome of the tests.”
Gray says biologists have collected thousands of samples during summer throughout the state, and the extended search for CWD will begin to slow once the first week of modern gun season has ended.

“We anticipate reigning back on our sampling beginning Nov. 18,” Gray said. “We’ll still be collecting samples from sick deer, but road kill samples will drop to weekdays during normal business hours.”

Hunters may voluntarily submit their deer for CWD testing to a list of veterinarians available at www.agfc.com/cwd. AGFC photo.

Hunters may voluntarily submit their deer for CWD testing to a list of veterinarians available at http://www.agfc.com/cwd. AGFC photo.

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