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ALERT – Chronic wasting disease confirmed in one Arkansas elk

An elk harvested near Pruitt on the Buffalo National River during the October 2015 hunting season tested positive for chronic wasting disease, according to the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.

This is the first time an animal in Arkansas has tested positive for the disease, which is fatal to elk and white-tailed deer. To discuss the development, the Commission called a special meeting for 5:30 p.m. at the AGFC’s main office, 2 Natural Resources Drive, in Little Rock.

The AGFC created a CWD response plan in 2006, as the disease was appearing in other states.

“Several years ago, Arkansas proactively took measures to put a testing procedure in place and created an emergency CWD plan,” said Brad Carner, chief of the AGFC Wildlife Management Division. “Those precautions are now proving to be beneficial. We are in a strong position to follow the pre-established steps to ensure the state’s valuable elk and white-tailed deer herds remain healthy and strong.”

To determine how prevalent the disease may be, samples from up to 300 elk and white-tailed deer combined within a 5-mile radius of where the diseased elk was harvested will be tested. There is no reliable U.S. Department of Agriculture-approved test for CWD while the animals are alive. The AGFC will work with the National Park Service and local landowners to gather samples for testing.

A multi-county CWD management zone will be established, and public meetings in the area will be scheduled as forums to discuss plans and to answer questions.

The number of positive samples collected, if any, will help AGFC biologists determine the prevalence of CWD, and will guide their strategy to contain it.

“Although CWD is a serious threat to Arkansas’s elk and white-tailed deer, we are not the first to deal with the disease,” said AGFC Director Mike Knoedl. “Our staff is prepared and, with help from the public, will respond with effective measures. We have learned from the experiences of 23 other states.”

Biologists don’t know how the disease reached northern Arkansas at this point. The local herd began with 112 elk from Colorado and Nebraska, relocated between 1981-85.

“(CWD) would have raised its ugly head a lot sooner than now,” said Don White, a wildlife ecologist at the University of Arkansas Agriculture Experiment Station in Monticello. “I think that it’s extremely unlikely that it came from those 112 elk.”

Biologists have tested 204 Arkansas elk for CWD since 1997; the 2½-year-old female was the only one with a positive result. The AGFC also has routinely sampled thousands of white-tailed deer across the state since 1998.

Samples from the diseased female elk were tested at the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Madison, and verified by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa.

There are no confirmed cases of CWD transmission from cervids to humans or to livestock,

“As far as we know, it’s not transmissible to humans at all,” said Sue Weinstein, state public health veterinarian for the Arkansas Department of Health. “In other states where they have CWD and they are studying this, they have found no human disease at all. To be on the safe side, it is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control, the World Health Organization and by the Department of Health that you not eat meat from an animal that you know is infected with chronic wasting disease.”

CWD was first documented among captive mule deer in Colorado in 1967, and has been detected in 24 states and two Canadian provinces. It’s been found in the wild in 20 states and among captive cervids in 15 states.

The AGFC has taken several steps to prevent the disease from entering the state. The Commission established a moratorium on the importation of live cervids in 2002, and restricted the importation of cervid carcasses in 2005. It also set moratoriums on permits for commercial hunting resorts and breeder/dealer permits for cervid facilities in 2006, and on obtaining hand-captured white-tailed deer in 2012.

According to the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance, CWD affects only cervids (hoofed animals in the cervidae family such as deer, elk and moose). Biologists believe it is transmitted through feces, urine and saliva. Prions (abnormal cellular proteins) that carry CWD have an incubation period of at least 16 months, and can survive for years in organic matter such as soil and plants.

CWD affects the body’s nervous system. Once in a host’s body, prions transform normal cellular protein into an abnormal shape that accumulates until the cell ceases to function. Infected animals begin to lose weight, lose their appetite and develop an insatiable thirst. They tend to stay away from herds, walk in patterns, carry their head low, salivate and grind their teeth.

Visit http://www.agfc.com/cwd for more information.

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25 applicants were chosen for the 2013 Arkansas Public Land Elk Hunts.

25 applicants were chosen for the 2013 Arkansas Public Land Elk Hunts.

For 25 lucky hunters, the highlight of the Buffalo River Elk Festival was the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s drawing for public land elk hunting permits. The two-segment season will be Oct. 7-11 and Oct. 28-Nov. 1.
Elk hunting on private land is restricted to one zone, consisting of all private land in Boone, Carroll, Madison, Newton and Searcy counties except for a portion of Boxley Valley.
The hunt will end the evening of Nov. 1, or the evening that the 28 elk quota (8 bulls, 20 antlerless) is met; whichever comes first.
Public land elk permit winners:
Garrett Day, Springdale –Youth either-sex permit, Zone 3, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Caleb Reynolds, Camden – Zone 2 youth either-sex permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Michael Davis, Pocahontas – Zone 1 either-sex permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1
Olivia Lowe, Conway – Zone 1, antlerless permit, Oct. 7-11 hunt
Royce Alford, Cabot – Zone 1, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Jackie Hardin, Hot Springs – Zone 1, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Bob Kissire, Hot Springs – Zone 2, either-sex permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Jerry Anderson, Berryville – Zone 2, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Paul Yoder, Everton – Zone 2, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Leer Smith, Clinton – Zone 2, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Judson Miller, Concord – Zone 2, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
James Harris, Mayflower – Zone 2, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Donald Moix, Conway – Zone 3, either-sex permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Coy Christopher, Bismarck – Zone 3, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
William Harris, Fayetteville – Zone 3, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Clayton Houston, Jonesboro – Zone 3, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Roger Shearer, Paragould – Zone 3, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Garlon Hurley, Conway – Zone 3, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Charles Speer, Little Rock – Zone 4, either-sex permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Jimmy Chandler, Malvern – Zone 4, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Chad Hall, Siloam Springs – Zone 4, antlerless permit, Oct. 28-Nov. 1 hunt
Billy Burleson, Lead Hill – Zone 4, antlerless permit, Oct. 7-11 hunt
Rodney Dodson, Fouke – Zone 1, on site either-sex permit, Oct. 7-11 hunt
Charles Gerhardt, Roger – Zone 2, on site antlerless permit, Oct. 7-11 hunt
Shane Lyerly, Jonesboro – Zone 3, on site antlerless permit, Oct. 7-11 hunt
Alternates:
Alternate 1 – Christopher Pry, Jonesboro
Alternate 2 – David C. Faught, Jasper
Alternate 3 – Todd Armstrong, Little Rock

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25 lucky hunters were drawn for Arkansas’s coveted elk tags.

For 25 lucky hunters, the highlight of the Buffalo River Elk Festival was the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s drawing for public land elk hunting permits.

The two-segment season will be Sept. 24-28 and Oct. 29-Nov. 2. Elk hunting on private land is restricted to one zone, consisting of all private land in Boone, Carroll, Madison, Newton and Searcy counties except for a portion of Boxley Valley.

The private land hunt will end Nov. 2, or the evening that the 34 elk quota (10 bulls, 24 antlerless) is met; whichever comes first.

Public land elk permit winners:

Compartment 3

  • Brent Hohenstein, either sex, Sept. 24-28 hunt, Searcy.
  • Jeffrey Phillips, either sex youth permit, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Wilburn.
  • Jarrett Yingling, either sex youth permit, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Judsonia.
  • Larry Roton, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Prairie Grove.
  • Justin Holt, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Rose Bud.
  • Lyndell Storey, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Batesville.
  • Angi Harrover, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Leslie.
  • Drake Smelser, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Walnut Ridge.
  • Justin Reddell, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Jasper.
  • John Hudson, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Harrison.
  • Robbie Crocker, either sex, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Murfreesboro.
  • Christopher Racey, either sex, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Little Rock.
  • Doug Brents, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Cleveland.

Compartment 4

  • Jimmy Cox, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt , Bono.
  • Richard Loggains, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Harrisburg.
  • Joseph Snow, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Gravette.
  • Brenda Wilson, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Amity.
  • Dylan York, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Salem.
  • Bob Middleton, either sex, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Paragould.
  • Wesley Fletcher, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Monticello.
  • Bill Bell, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Mena.
  • Rhett McManigell, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Gassville.
  • Michael Shields, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Fort Smith.
  • Kent Ruddick, either sex, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, Garfield.
  • Lee Hankins, antlerless, Oct. 29-Nov. 2 hunt, White Hall.

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